Workshop – Fabric printing induction

Today we got a chance to have one of the tech dems (technical demonstrators) talk to us about the possibilities of printing on fabric. The pictures I’m posting are all samples that have been left behind by previous students, and none of them were made by me. However I think it would be helpful to have them posted here so I have a easy to find reminder of the techniques I could potentially use in the future

In order of preference, possibly my favourite technique that I saw today was Devoré (also known as burn out according to wikipedia). This involves applying a chemical to the fabric which dissolves a layer, creating a translucent pattern. Not only does it look beautiful, I think it would also add a level of professionalism to any product or object made with it, as it is not a technique that is often used at home by amateurs.

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My next favourite technique was the use of mylar foil. From what I understand, this involves screen printing a glue or a chemical onto the fabric, and then laying the foil on top and steaming it. Again, I think the is not only aesthetically pleasing, but adds a high level of value and professionalism to the work

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Two other interesting techniques I would like to use in future are flocking and “puff”. I assume that puff is a shorter name for the technique? but that’s all the tech dem referred to it as. The flocking adds a soft layer ontop of your fabric by you first printing a layer of glue onto the fabric and then laying the flocking ontop. The puff is made using the same technique (I think) but with puff not flocking, and then steaming the fabric in order for the puff to raise.

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The heat transfer was also interesting, which I think involves printing an image on to a special type of sheet, and then ironing it onto the fabric? the result is quite haunting

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The next image looks similar to the heat transfer, but was in the “photocopy transfer” section of the folder I was looking through. However the folder did seem poorly organised in places, so I’m not entirely sure

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Then we have wax resist, a technique I’ve seen before and personally, has never jumped out at me

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And finally felt, which again doesn’t really inspire me, although maybe these are less interesting examples than what is possible to create with it

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